"Education is learning what you didn't even know you didn't know." Daniel J. Boorstin

British Values

Pendle Vale College

Policy Statement on the promotion of “British” values 

In November 2014, the UK Government published advice for the promotion of of British values in schools. This policy statement is based upon this advice. The government set out a definition of British values the 2011 Prevent strategy, comprising the following:

  • Democracy
  • The rule of law
  • Individual liberty
  • Mutual respect and tolerance of those of different faiths and beliefs

As a multi-cultural school, Pendle Vale actively seeks to actively promote these values within an atmosphere of respect, tolerance and the celebration of difference. The mechanism for the achievement of this is summarised below.

Democracy

The Citizenship curriculum at KS3 discusses the importance of a parliamentary system, the mechanism for a parliamentary democracy, the freedoms afforded to citizens of a democracy and develops an understanding of the consequences of an undemocratic society. This is taught in accordance with the KS3 National Curriculum.

In addition, students have the opportunity to be elected to an active student council and participate in a full assembly programme which includes reference to democracy and freedoms. There are also regular trips to London as part of the Raising Achievement Day (RAD) programme and members of the student council have had opportunities to meet with the local MP.

The rule of law

An understanding of the ways in which laws are created and enforced are explored through the Citizenship curriculum in KS3. Students also have a clear understanding of the internal rules and regulations through an understanding of the school rewards and sanctions policy, known as “Behaviour for Learning” which is built around a “Respect” agenda.

 Individual liberty

 Students understand the importance of individual liberty through, for example, learning about how people have campaigned for freedom and liberty to be more widespread. Examples of this include the suffragettes movement and the first world war in History, assemblies about Malala Yousafzai’s campaign to get girls to be entitled to go to school and work on the fall of the Berlin wall. Students study texts exploring the ideas of freedom, such as “To Kill a Mockingbird” and “The Boy In The Striped Pyjamas” in English. Students are encouraged to behave in a respectful manner and are expected to show tolerance and understanding where others have different beliefs. These differences are celebrated.

 Mutual respect and tolerance of those with different faiths and beliefs

A full religious studies curriculum, with an hour for all students form years 7 – 11, explores different world religions and leads onto an in-depth study of religion and morality at KS4 (starting in Year 9). Many faiths are represented in the college and students have an excellent record of pulling together to support charities from many faith and non-faith groups. Examples of this have been fund raising for global disasters such as the Pakistan earthquake, with charities such as the British Red Cross and Mulsim Global Relief, as well as generous donations being made to charities such as the National Aids Trust (World Aids Day) and the Royal British Legion (Poppy Appeal). Issues are explored and discussed through form time and the assemblies programme and students are encouraged to think about the perspectives of people with different beliefs to their own.